To reach us by telephone:

770-939-4531

 ADVICE FROM YOUR

BIRD’S BEST ADVOCATES

 
Do you have a question that you have not found an answer for throughout this website or in my FAQ? Use this link to send your question directly to me. Be as specific as possible about the symptom or behavior in question...
 
 
 

Dr. Rob is a world renowned avian veterinarian in Sydney, Australia. He was the veterinary consultant for the Northern Territory Nature and Conservation Commission for a scientific study of the disease status in the wild population of the endangered Gouldian Finches as it related to a "Recovery Plan".

 

 

Tailai O’Brien is a Parrot Behavior Consultant who has worked along side Dr. Marshall and has developed special regimes for successful bird training and behavioral development. Fill out her Questionnaire so that she may help you with your parrot’s bad behavior.
 
 
 
 
 

Ladygouldian.com

is now a proud sponsor of the

 Save the Gouldian Fund

 

A portion of all of our sales will be donated to the fund, in the hope that we may contribute in a small way to saving the wild

Gouldian Finches.

 

CLICK HERE to learn more…

Click on an image to see it at full size.

Diagnosis: Acquired Melanism. Not a genetic mutation, therefore it cannot be passed to future generations.

Treatment: Birds exhibiting these dark feathers during the molt should be moved to good, bright lighting conditions before the next annual molt as dark environmental lighting is believed to be the major cause of this melanistic (darkened) feathering in feathers that are not normally dark brown or black in color.

Diagnosis: Acquired Melanism. Not a genetic mutation, therefore it cannot be passed to future generations.

Treatment: This young Gouldian should be moved to good, bright lighting conditions before the juvenile molt begins, as dark environmental lighting is believed to be the major cause of this melanistic (darkened) feathering in feathers that are not normally dark brown or black in color.

Diagnosis: American White Parrotlet was scoped for mites or skin issues but none were found. Then it was discovered that she was being picked on by another bird in her flight.

Treatment: Sugar Queen was brought in from the colony and made into a pet. Her head and neck feathers returned. She now has a nice partner that treats her like the Queen her name implies.

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE PAGE